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Friday, October 10, 2014

Friday Finds

The Nina and the Pinta


I found a little history in downtown Little Rock. The Nina and the Pinta arrived yesterday. I was disappointed that I missed seeing them come in. They were supposed to come up the river and dock at 1 p.m., but when I got downtown shortly after twelve they were already docked. I'm sure it's hard to keep schedules on the river. We had some storms in the area earlier and I wondered if they may have arrived early to avoid them.



The Nina and the Pinta are replicas of the original Spanish trading vessels that Christopher Columbus used on his first voyage across the Atlantic to the West Indies in 1492. Columbus sailed the Nina, which was his favorite, over 25,000 nautical miles.


The Nina is the first truly, historically correct replica of a 15th Century Caravel ship. It was build using only adzes (which is similar to an ax), hand saws, axes, and chisels, in addition to naturally-shaped timbers from the Brazilian forest. The Pinta is a larger version Caravel ship offering more deck space for tours, private parties, and charters.



Cloudy skies soon changed to blue which certainly helped the rigging to stand out better.


The ships weren't open for tours yet, so It was nice to be there with very few others and get pictures without the crowds. I had to take pictures very quickly though. Parking is not good in our downtown area. You either park in a deck which is costly or you park on the street and pay the meter. I only had a little change which resulted in exactly 48 minutes of parking. I had to rush to the river, snap some pictures, and rush back. I've been on the ships once before several years ago, so I'm not sure I'll take the tour again, but I am trying to find out what time they'll be leaving. I would love to get pictures of them sailing instead of docked.

Linking with Kim's Friday Finds.

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13 comments:

  1. lovely Cathy, I saw these when I lived in CA and they were docked in San Francisco and I was surprised how small these vessels were. Love the masts.

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  2. Your mast shot is awesome! Happy Friday!

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  3. What fun! I love old sailing ships, even replicas! The masts are always so intricate and intriguing and you got lovely photos of them.

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  4. Though Columbus's reputation is certainly not what it was when I learned about his voyages as a schoolgirl, it would still be fascinating to see replicas of the ships he sailed in. They look so small! It's amazing to think of people setting out to cross the ocean in such vulnerable-seeming vessels.

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  5. thank you for sharing these wonderful photos of these historic boats! Can you even imagine crossing the Atlantic in them??

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  6. Oh, they look so very tiny! The bravery and courage it must have taken to set sail for the unknown in these small ships. There is something so beautiful about rigging against the sky.

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  7. Look at you chasing ships, battling the parking and speed photographing in 48 minutes. Awesome!!

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  8. What an amazing sight. The ships look stunning; kind of like seeing a bit of the river in some strange time warp. Having said that I'd want something a little more substantial to cross the mighty Atlantic Ocean. You've taken some lovely photos in your 48 minutes' parking time. Well done. All the best, Bonny

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  9. Incredible images ... I can't even begin to imagine how scary it would be to cross the Atlantic in those ...

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  10. I love that second shot of the close up of the lovely sailing boat and the reflections are dreamy! How nice of the sky to turn blue just for you and your last capture! Have a happy weekend!

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  11. This looks like a fun afternoon! You got some wonderful shots!

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  12. Hi Cathy, You got some good photos of the ships in your short time at the harbor! Think what it would be like to sail one of those...

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Thanks so much for stopping by!!